Treat Low Libido

Four Things the Weather does to your T Levels

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Each season brings about something special. Summer – we think about vacations, beaches and excitement. Autumn – we associate with thanksgiving and cozying up with a mug of hot chocolate. Winter – we look forward to long, hot baths and bringing out our favorite knitwear. Spring is a time for fresh hair, flowers and revival. Aside from this, each season also influences our testosterone levels and our sexual activity. Let’s explore how and why we experience seasonal hormone variations, and especially what the weather does to your testosterone levels.

Diet changes

During certain seasons we’re more likely to eat certain foods and drink specific drinks. Let’s take the fall when we’re full on Thanksgiving and pumpkin pie.

Certain odors and flavors can trigger sexual response. One study found that men who sniffed an odor mixture of pumpkin spice and doughnut had a 20% increase in penile blood flow. And pumpkin spice and lavender mixture led to a 40% increase. Researchers explain that it is because men evolved to be sexually primed by food.

Additionally, when it’s cold we naturally crave hot drinks more. A hot cocoa makes us feel warmer, emotionally and physically. It also makes us perceive others that way.

It is said that ginger is a supplement that is used to raise testosterone levels naturally. Ginger certainly is more common in the fall and winter when we’re busy making soups and pies.

Do you experience a boost in testosterone during the colder weather seasons?

Testosterone levels in the summer

Many researchers claim that fall is the time when testosterone levels and sperm counts are the highest. During the hot summer months, sperm count and quality is lower, and it can take a few weeks for it to rise again. This is also supported by birth patterns. November and December seem to be the most fertile months of the year, since birth rates are generally highest around August and September.

Women, too, are affected by testosterone fluctuations based on the season. Though it must be pointed out that in a 2006 study, while both men and women had higher levels of T in the fall, women also had high levels in the summer. Men showed the lowest levels of testosterone in spring.

Other studies suggest that the summer is a time when serotonin (the feel good hormone) levels rise due to the increase in sunlight. With it, our energy levels and our libido increase. Whereas in the winter when it is darker, melatonin is released instead.

So, are you of the ones whose testosterone increases in the warmer weather?

The weather and your mood

It’s not completely clear why certain seasons affect our libido in different ways. It could be a mixture of changes in social activity and levels of daylight.

During the cold months, we are less likely to want to go to the beach and make a barbeque in the garden. We are more likely to focus on indoor activities at home – including spending intimate time with your other half. Whether it’s due to raised testosterone levels that this is true, or simply that the colder weather leaves us with fewer options, is up for debate! 

Hot and humid weather can also make us feel sluggish and lethargic. It is much easier to go swimming to cool down than getting close to another body. This could be due to lower testosterone levels, or it could simply be a matter of taste and personality.

During fall and winter when there is less sunlight, there is indeed an increase in melatonin which makes us want to curl up on the couch and go to sleep. But it can also make us want to snuggle up to our partners to keep warm.

It is normal for our levels of testosterone to fluctuate depending on the season. If, however, you find that you rarely have a libido it could be that you suffer from low levels of testosterone all year round. In which case hormone replacement therapy might help you. It is always advisable to consult with your practitioner to get tested before undergoing any treatment.

And the fourth thing?

You tell us! How does the weather affect your T levels? Let us know in the comments below!

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